Hand in Hand

MH900446450[1]

Hand in Hand

(A Villanelle)

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Entwined by love, we walk joined hand in hand.

Each spirit so delighted just to touch.

Two souls united, just as God had planned.

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Released to follow free our hearts command,

Elated just to be in love so much.

Entwined by love, we walk joined hand in hand.

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The vicissitudes of life we will withstand

Together, with affection’s ties we clutch.

Two souls united, just as God had planned.

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Connected odyssey in life’s quicksand,

With joy content to be each other’s crutch,

Entwined by love, we walk joined hand in hand.

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We don’t need a reminder love is grand.

It’s in our actions daily now, as such.

Two souls united, just as God had planned.

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If you’ve been there, you’ll surely understand,

A passion portrait doesn’t need retouch.

Entwined by love, we walk joined hand in hand,

Two souls united, just as God had planned.

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Author Notes

Joined together, a couple can face any diversity that life entails.


Holding hands is a wonderful expression of love and unity. It is a simple action that feels good, and is an outward expression to the world. As I walk, holding hands with my wife, it is amazing at how many comments we often get.


In this poem, relating to God’s plan, I deliberately made the choice of the word “had” instead of “has” to indicate that is has existed from the dawn of creation and also for the assonance in “had planned”.


This poem is a Villanelle. I’ve written some before, but was re-inspired when I reviewed one of FrannyG’s Villanelle, Valentine Villanelle. A villanelle is a nineteen-line poetic form consisting of five tercets followed by a quatrain. There are two refrains (A1 and A2) and two repeating rhymes (a and b), with the first and third line of the first tercet repeated alternately until the last stanza, which includes both repeated lines. The villanelle is an example of a fixed verse form.

It is structured by two repeating rhymes and two refrains: the first line of the first stanza serves as the last line of the second and fourth stanzas, and the third line of the first stanza serves as the last line of the third and fifth stanzas. The rhyme-and-refrain pattern of the villanelle can be schematized as:

(A1)b(A2) ab(A1) ab(A2) ab(A1) ab(A2) ab(A1)(A2)

where letters (“a” and “b”) indicate the two rhyme sounds, upper case indicates a refrain (“A”), and superscript numerals (1 and 2) indicate Refrain A1 and Refrain A2.


There is no specific meter required for a Villanelle. For this poem I chose to use iambic pentameter.


The artwork is courtesy of Microsoft ClipArt.

 

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Synergy of Poetry and Verse. Author, Poet, Photographer

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