God’s Eye

 

The Eye of God is looking down,
Sometimes with joy, most times with pain.
Our sins toward Him may make it frown.

Unfaithful souls, in sin we drown,
Without a thought what wrath we gain.
The Eye of God is looking down.

An evil cloaked gossamer gown
Can’t fool His Eye, the taints remain.
Our sins toward Him may make it frown.

For Satan is a lying clown
Who bends the truth of his disdain.
The Eye of God is looking down.

In heaven see God’s golden crown.
His Eye sees what our hearts contain.
Our sins toward Him may make it frown.

Beware delights demons explain.
They deal confusion to our brain.
The Eye of God is looking down.
Our sins toward Him may make it frown.

Author Notes:

A couple of nights ago I captured a sunset. Within it was this image. It made me think of an angry eye in the sky and became the inspiration for this poem. I also must thank fellow FanStorian, tfawcus. Tony reminded me of this lovely format that I hadn’t written in a while.

This poem is a Villanelle.
A villanelle is a nineteen-line poetic form consisting of five tercets followed by a quatrain. There are two refrains (A1 and A2) and two repeating rhymes (a and b), with the first and third line of the first tercet repeated alternately until the last stanza, which includes both repeated lines. The villanelle is an example of a fixed verse form. It is structured by two repeating rhymes and two refrains: the first line of the first stanza serves as the last line of the second and fourth stanzas, and the third line of the first stanza serves as the last line of the third and fifth stanzas.
The rhyme-and-refrain pattern of the villanelle can be schematized as:
(A1)b(A2) ab(A1) ab(A2) ab(A1) ab(A2) ab(A1)(A2)
where letters (“a” and “b”) indicate the two rhyme sounds, upper case indicates a repeated refrain (“A”), and superscript numerals (1 and 2) indicate Refrain A1 and Refrain A2.

There is no specific meter required for a Villanelle, but for this poem I chose iambic tetrameter.

This photograph was taken at dusk by the author on Saturday, April 4, 2015. Interestingly, that is the day after Good Friday, and a day before Easter Sunday.

Synergy of Poetry and Verse. Author, Poet, Photographer

%d bloggers like this: