Beware the Trees

Beware the Trees

(A Tambour Poem)

Angry trees

 

A forest glade with trees and shade, and travel trampled path
may harbor hosts of ghouls and ghosts, or hidden psychopaths.
For danger lurks in old earthworks concealed within the grass.
One seldom sees but even trees are hostile to trespass
Beware! The cunning trees, beware their evil strain
that holds a grudge when strangers trudge within their harsh domain.
Unbidden, unwanted, traveler’s tales say they’re haunted
where only the bravest, the very bravest, travel there undaunted.
Within this darkest vale, where travail may leave you pale
There’s an old wives’ tale, a beaten trail; where angry oaks, assail, assail

There’s an evil, evil breeze
Beware,beware those trees

I traveled there as it made my hair stand up on the back of my neck.
For while I tread with certain dread, I’m a total nervous wreck.
I felt the clutch of a wooden touch as I walked betwixt the boughs.
It may sound absurd, but the sounds I heard, made me crease my brows.
It wasn’t an owl that horrible howl I heard somewhere nearby.
It was long and foul, so long and foul, a craven creature’s cry.
There among the trees I fell to my knees praying “God, please save me now.”
But with faith destroyed I could not avoid the terror doubts allow.
Too late! Too late, to predict my fate. It was really sink or swim.
So without a word, with my vision blurred, I ran for life and limb.

There’s an evil, evil breeze
Beware,beware those trees

Daylight these woods are eerie, night time they’re downright scary.
You’ll spot a Leprechaun or Fairy, or something real frightening and hairy.
If you think you’re free from harm, no need for alarm. The truth is quite contrary.
It is understood that these very woods come alive. So you must not tary.
It may be best, you may have guessed, consider things possessed.
Don’t carry a heavy load while on the forest road, you may not want to rest
If you are there, become aware, you may get much more than fright.
Begone! Begone! Before the dawn. What you lean on may just bite.
Keep your feet prepared and fleet while considering retreat.
Because, before you hear it an evil spirit may consider you a treat.

So beware of those trees
There’s an evil breeze
flowing through those trees.
Beware! Beware! Oh please!

 

Author Notes:

Well just look at those trees. They have faces and grasping arms.
This poem is a Tambour.
The Tambour was created by Fanstorian RGstar. It is called ‘Tambour” which is French for drum.
It uses the rhythm of the parade drum. If one can visualize a parade walking by and the sound of the drums as they march. The poetry is set to mimic the sound and roll of the drum.
The basic form has ten long lines containing in-line rhyming on most (but not all) lines,

It uses 3 line types to gain this effect.
1) ‘PACE’ LINE= offers speed and an injection of emotion, intense or soft.
2) ‘COMMAND’ LINE = directs an order or a wish for a special action, strong or soft.
3) ‘DRUM ROLL’ LINE = creates that special rhythm in answer or in influence to the line before.
As far as I could surmise, these three aspects occur within the 10 line stanzas.
These are fundamental to the ”Tambour” and without using them it is nearly impossible to create it.
The basic form has three different stanza types. The first has ten long lines containing in-line rhyming on most (but not all) lines, and aabb end-line rhyming , followed by short rhyming couplets, until the last stanza, which has 4 lines that echo the earlier couplets.
Pace lines and the short syllable (Command lines) break up the rhythm of your base, or normal, lines .. followed directly by a long syllable ( Drum roll line) in answer to it or influenced by it. Without these , the Tambour would not be a Tambour.
The PACE lines throughout the poem are very important, because not only do they offer a break of rhythm, but what they contain or what they say are equally as important as syllables and rhythms they make.
There is no fixed meter, just the drum beats and rolls.


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