A Winter Visit

Old Man Winter sat on my porch,
and, arriving uninvited
lounged forthwith within my best perch.
Many flaky friends alighted,
leaving my back deck in the lurch.

Wonder just how long that they’ll stay?
Hope they leave before I see Spring,
who’s expected here any day,
bringing life to everything.
Winter, please, go hit the byways!

I’ll just keep my shovel handy,
fearing that they’ll stay too long.
I will watch while sipping brandy,
hinting that they don’t belong.
Quick departure would be dandy.

Here is where I’ll chase those flakes from,
If they linger past their welcome.

 

Author Notes:

This is a picture of my back deck, through my screen patio door, that I took on January 22, 2018. That snow is still on the ground, although I have since shoveled off my deck and driveway. I thought a bit of humor appropriate. Note the intentional use of some near rhymes.

This poem is a Diciasette Sonnet
The Diciasette Sonnet is one of the elongated Sonnet formats. I just created this one today. My latest book of Sonnets identifies others: the 15 Line
Carrett Sonnet, the 20 Line Caudette Sonnet, the 28 Line Compound Sonnet, Danteâ??s
20 Line Version, the 21 Line Fusion Sonnet, the 18 Line Heroic Sonnet, the 17 Line
Septillian Sonnet, and finally, the 16 Line Super Sonnet. Diciasette is the Italian word fot the number 17. So, this is a 17 line Sonnet similar to the Septillian Sonnet that Nancy E. Davis created. Hers also uses Quintrains (5 line stanzas) for its stanzas with a closing couplet, but her rhyme scheme is aabbb ccddd eefff gg, while mine is ababa cdcdc efefe gg. Also, her meter is iambic Pentameter, while mine is trochaic tetrameter.
So, a Diciasette Sonnet is a 17 line Sonnet with 3 each, 5 line stanzas, followed by a rhyming closing couplet. It is written in trochaic tetrameter with a rhyme scheme of:
ababa cdcdc efefe gg, or any other rhyme scheme that fits a 5 line stanzaic pattern.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.

Synergy of Poetry and Verse. Author, Poet, Photographer

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