Miricle on Ice

A Miracle!
A Miracle!
We won the game!
We won the Game!
As odds proclaimed a miracle,
The game we won was spectacle.

Hurray, for USA!
Hurray, for USA!
The Russians lost!
The Russians lost!
Because the Russians lost today,
For USA, I’ll shout HURRAY!

They said, no chance!
They said, no chance!
The victors overcame!
The victor’s overcame!
Despite they said we have no chance,
The victors overcame. Let’s dance!

For USA, I’ll shout HURRAY!
As odds proclaimed a miracle,
Because the Russians lost today,
The game we won was spectacle.
Despite they said we have no chance,
The victors overcame. Let’s dance!

Author Notes:

Although this is not one of my favorite formats, I thought its repetition would be a good way to express the emotions reflected in this statue of Herb Brooks, located in front of the River Center’s Ordway entrance in downtown St. Paul. Herb was the head coach of the 1980 USA Olympic hockey team that defeated the Russians in a game that became known as “The Miracle on Ice.” Herb is a native Minnesotan, and was head coach of the University of Minnesota hockey team from which, several of the Olympic players also came. His exuberant style, as depicted here, lead the team to victory.

This poem is a Paradelle.
I was introduced to this format by Fanstorian Sunnilicious, in her poem, The Jewel Box.
Paradelle is a French form of poetry with many repeated lines. It is considered difficult to write. It is comprised of 4 stanzas that build within, as well as upon, each other. The format is as follows:
In Stanzas 1, 2 and 3 – lines 1 & 2 of each stanza are short, identical repeats of each other, as are line 3 & 4 also identical in the stanza. However, lines 5 & 6 are rhymed statements made up of all the words in lines 1 & 3. So the short statements become a rhymed couplet, by adding a few other words.
But Stanza 4 is a compilation of all the rhyming couplets (two from each stanza) to make its own stanza of six lines. They don’t don’t have to be in the same order necessarily.
So the rhyme scheme becomes;
AABB(x1)(x2) – CCDD(x3)(x4) – EEFF(x5)(x6) – (x1)(x2)(x3)(x4)(x5)(x6) , where the capital letters indicate identically repeated lines, and the numbered x is a compilation of a capitalized line to make up a line of the couplet.

I hope that makes some sense.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 31, 2016.

Synergy of Poetry and Verse. Author, Poet, Photographer

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