Wintery Water World

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As wind-blown waves will break on shore,
So frost begins to form an ice-clad beach.
The wetted rocks create unstable floor,
Too dangerous, and much too hard to reach.

So frost begins to form an ice-clad beach.
Superior has donned her cold attire.
Too dangerous, and much too hard to reach,
When Winter and the water world conspire.

Superior has donned her cold attire,
To dance a torrid tango with Jack Frost.
When Winter and the water world conspire,
There is no finer scene at any cost.

To dance a torrid tango with Jack Frost,
The wetted rocks create unstable floor.
There is no finer scene at any cost.
As wind-blown waves will break on shore.

Author Notes:

The Characters in this poem:

Superior – Lake Superior, for purposes of this poem, a lady.
Winter – Old Man Winter.
Jack Frost – Winter personified.

I love to visit Lake Superior in the winter. For then, it takes on a new personality of ice and snow. It yields wonderful photographs that spike my imagination. Here, the waves breaking on the shore reminded me of a chilly dance between the lake and winter. It is interesting to note that when I took this photograph at Britton Beach, there were surfers in wetsuits out in the waves surfing. But that’s another story for another day.

I missed the Pantoum contest, but reviewed some, and since I haven’t written one in a while, I thought I’d post one of mine.

This poem is a Pantoum.
A Pantoum is a poem that is made up of quatrains with interweaving repeated lines. In that sense, the pantoum is a form of poetry similar to a villanelle. It is composed of a series of quatrains; the second and fourth lines of each stanza are repeated as the first and third lines of the next. This pattern continues for any number of stanzas, except for the final stanza, which differs in the repeating pattern. The first and third lines of the last stanza are the second and fourth of the penultimate; the first line of the poem is the last line of the final stanza, and the third line of the first stanza is the second of the final.

Ideally, the meaning of lines shifts when they are repeated although the words remain exactly the same. So, although they are the same words, their meaning is changed. this gives the poem it’s intrinsic beauty.

A four-stanza Pantoum is common, (although more may be used) and in the final stanza, you could simply repeat lines one and three from the first stanza, or write new lines.

The tytpical Pantoum outline is as follows:

Stanza 1: A B C D
Stanza 2: B E D F
Stanza 3: E G F H
Stanza 4: G C H A

This photograph was taken by the author himself on March 4, 2013, near Duluth, Minnesota.

Synergy of Poetry and Verse. Author, Poet, Photographer

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