Brilliant Yellow Stars

Yellow Star Flower

Brilliant Yellow Star

(A Quatern)

.

.

When brilliant yellow stars shine bright,

They are not always in the sky,

As some create a floating sight,

On lily pads that grow nearby.

.
You may find sweet serenity

When brilliant yellow stars shine bright.

Wishes become reality,

Although it isn’t really night.

.
On water standing so upright,

An amazing aquatic plant,

When brilliant yellow stars shine bright,

There’s a tendency to enchant.

.
Make a wish on one when you find

A brilliant glow of pure delight,

In the Creator’s pure design,

When brilliant yellow stars shine bright.

.

Author Notes

This amazing little aquatic plant that looks like a twinkling star, or even a starfish, is actually a flower called a Nymphoides Crenata. A true water nymph that can be found in bogs, ponds, aquariums, and even some wishing wells. Its leaves resemble lily pads. It has long underwater roots and floating leaves. It is typically yellow, but white ones are known as water snowflakes. Each flower lasts only one day, but the plant produces many more as the roots spread ultimately providing a blizzard of yellow. It blooms from early spring until the first hard frost.


This poem is a Quatern. A poem I reviewed  of Honeycomb, The Joy of Love, inspired me to write in this format.

The Quatern is a French form of poetry that is composed of four quatrains, (four-line stanzas). It is similar to the Kyrielle and other French poems, in that it has a repeated refrain. But, unlike other French forms, it doesn’t have to rhyme–there is no rhyme scheme specified. Similar to other French forms of poetry, the Quatern consists of lines with eight syllables each, and has no required meter. 


Even though they do not have to rhyme or follow a specific meter, I have chosen to write my Quatern poems in iambic tetrameter with a rhyme scheme of: Abab, cAca, adAd, eaeA, where the first and third lines of each stanza rhyme and where the second and fourth lines of each stanza rhyme, and the A represents the Refrain line. 


This photograph was taken by the author in the floating garden surrounding the Como Conservatory in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Synergy of Poetry and Verse. Author, Poet, Photographer

%d bloggers like this: