Bittersweet Nightshade

Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade

(A Poem about a Wildflower)

.

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Nightshade: a bittersweet

Wildflower you may meet.

.
When Bittersweet Nightshade hangs on the vine

Its attractive colors may look divine.

With pretty purple flowers on narrow stem,

So clearly centered on bright yellow chutes,

May attract curious children to them.

Beware of tiny red poisonous fruits!

.
Nightshade: a bittersweet

Wildflower you may meet.

.
When Bittersweet Nightshade hangs on the vine

Its creepers may climb to choke a small pine.

An invasive plant, survives any clime,

While its leaves can cause an itchy rash too,

It out-competes native shrubs most the time,

So it’s a problem for folks to walk through.

.
Nightshade: a bittersweet

Wildflower you may meet.

.
When Bittersweet Nightshade hangs on the vine

You don’t even want to feed it to swine.

It needs very little sunshine or care.

It can grow in a field, forest, or street.

In fact, it can grow almost anywhere.

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Bittersweet Nightshade:

Wildflower you may meet.

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So it may look pretty

In forest or city,

If it’s found in your zone

Best leave it alone.

.

Author Notes This wildflower can be dangerous. It is called Bittersweet Nightshade, but is has also been called: Blue Bindweed, Climbing Nightshade, Poisonberry, Snakeberry, and Violet Bloom. It has a pretty purple flower around a yellow stamen. It is native to Asia, Northern Africa, and Europe, but is invasive to North America. It is related to the potato and the tomato. It has a red berry that is poisonous to livestock and humans, but is a food to some birds, especially the Thrushes. The fruits and leaves contain Solanine. The fruit changes colors as it matures from green, to yellow, to orange, and then to red. The leaves and immature berries are the most toxic and have been known to kill children. You can also get a rash from the leaves and stems. It is considered a noxious weed in many states in the US. It grows in all terrains, especially wetlands  and forests, but does fine on roadsides, even in cities. Its vines can out-compete most native shrubs. It can overgrow and choke out small trees.


This poem has no formal format. The large stanzas have a rhyme scheme of aabcbc and syllable count of 10.

The envoi has a rhyme scheme of aabb and syllable count of 6

.The refrains are rhyming couplets with a count of 6.


This photograph was taken by the author himself.

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Synergy of Poetry and Verse. Author, Poet, Photographer

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