Loved One’s Lament

002

Loved One’s Lament

(A Canzone)
.

.

I feel cold rain drops splashing upon my skin.

It dampens my mood within.

These liquid drops falling heavy from the sky,

Match the tears that wet my eyes.

.
Like tiny water bombs, they hit – then explode!

Dreams, my own, sadly implode.

Rivulets run rapidly across my face.

On my knees I pray for grace.

.
This stormy sky, suddenly as black as coal,

Reflects pain gripping my soul.

As raging sky rains wrath upon Mother Earth,

This vision contests my worth.

.
With white water rising ’round me rapidly,

Fight to free the Thee in me

While mighty flood gates hold back the water’s flow

I refuse to let you  go!

.
I find I’m weeping on consecrated ground

With dark wet stones all around.

As the  angry cloud bursts wildly weep with me,

You’re off to eternity.

.
Your spirit’s gone, leaving only skin and bone,

And I am left here alone,

Sadly sodden, and alone.

.

   
Author Notes

Just a poem about the sadness of a loved one’s passing and the devastation felt.


This poem is structured with 5 each 4 line stanzas in a fixed format of rhyme and syllable count. The syllable count is 11/7/11/7 and the rhyme scheme is abab. I closed it an Envoi of 3 lines of 11/7/7, and mono-rhymed rhyme scheme. It may be a Canzone. Literally “song” in Italian, a canzone (plural: canzoni) (cognate with English to chant) is an Italian or Provençal song or ballad. It is also used to describe a type of lyric which resembles a madrigal. Sometimes a composition which is simple and songlike is designated as a canzone, especially if it is by a non-Italian. Derived from the Provençal canso, the very lyrical and original Italian canzone consists of 5 to 7 stanzas typically set to music, each stanza resounding the first in rhyme scheme and in number of lines (7 to 20 lines). The canzone is typically hendecasyllabic (11 syllables). 


This photograph was taken by the author.

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Synergy of Poetry and Verse. Author, Poet, Photographer

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